Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
at how spending cuts in the so-called fiscal cliff would affect national security. also, our "washington journal" series on the fiscal cliff with talk about the alternative minimum tax. we will also talk with senator tom cole of oklahoma. >> several liebowitz to tell you about on c-span3 tomorrow. politico post journalists and author bob woodward and marco rubio. a little after 8:00 a.m. eastern. at 10:00 o'clock, the senate appropriations committee will hear about the federal response hurricane sandy. fema director craig fugate and senators from some of the affected states. the house foreign affairs committee and the regional influence. that is at 2:00 p.m. eastern. the senate voted on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. sixty-six votes were needed for ratification. sixty-eight to 38 the vote failed. >> i think it would be fair not to use of the time in an unfair way. i would ask that if they are not ready to use their time, that this be charged against them. because i think it is important that we don't give a part-time as a result of that. i ask unanimous consent that we not be charged
. >> on tomorrow morning's washington gorgeous -- washington journal, we continue a look at the fiscal cliff and what happens if those cuts take place in january. after that, charles clark of the government executive media group, looks at the domestic program cuts. and then more about the issue with is bell sawhill
to the conversation on the fiscal cliff this morning from the washington journal and a look at how the business is might be affected. of >>> let's begin with what iss bi comeess and how does it t: about?t's >> guest: is an organization with a simple mission. our job is trying to make it ist easier for business leaders inon about country that care about policy issues but don't have a washington office or don't havea town spe to speak out on the issuesak of the public policy. >> host: so, is this a brand-new organization? >> guest: even a route for years three and a half supported by some of the biggest companies in c the world, but o- business leaders are around the country. we go out to small business owners and entrepreneurs and venture capitalists and try to o get them g more involved in the policy-making process. we so what we do isbring administrn officials, members of congress, governors out to cities around the country to do briefings with business leaders. we also bring those business leaders to washington and the president's economic team and tell them how to grow jobs and help the eco
and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate representative of its country's people. turkish journalism has reported that the new america foundation. two men have returned from the country into the to the west can do more to help the syrian people. [inaudible conve
cliff. this twenty five minute event took police at the veteran affair offices in washington, d.c. >>> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for the unwavering support for the here at the va and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniform of the nation. our close partnership with the immediating we had -- meeting we had today on their behalf has never been more important as it is today. as we enter the holiday season i want to thank the men and whoim spend their holiday away from the families defending the nation. we're grateful for their the service and sacrifice. as we have discussed very little what we do here at va -- most of what we work on originated in dodd and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires the close and collaborative working relationship. we have more to do but with president obama's strong support and guidance we have brought the two departments closer together than ever before. we have underwritten joint vad. we began harmonizing our decisions. we committed both department to a common joint integrated health record. the i
of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterson. i would like to give you a review of why we are supporting this project today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trends, on the vast and unfunded promise we have made. i have decided was not unsustainable, but a primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house in which i served, the chairman of the council, if something is unsustainable, he says it continues to stop. or if you don't like that, if your worst eyes, i suggest that you does not dis
with the fiscal cliff, myself included, and what's happening with this budget showdown. yet the polling seems to indicate for most americans outside the beltway job creation and the state of the economy remains the main concern. go ahead, tom. what were you going to say? >> i think from a business perspective certainly the large corporations are sitting on lots of cash they are not investing right now because they want to ensure the future is going to bring not just the economic future but also the future of the tax policy and all the rest of that tied hand to hand so that is in some we keeping the economy back. we can reach some sort of a deal where we are not coming to blows every six months or a year on the tax policy for another six months. that's going to give a lot of confidence and i think create the kind of growth people say they want. i'm not so sure there is a bifurcation between what washington is focus on and what people say they want because i think all this ultimately is about jobs and economic growth. >> i did find one thing surprising and the intensity of it, and that is behin
really interesting. washington is so obsessed right now with the fiscal cliff, myself included. what is happening with the budget showdown. yet they -- the polling seems to indicate that job creation and and the state of the economy remain, you know, their main concern. go ahead, todd. >> i think they go hand in hand because from a business perspective certainly, large corporations are sitting on lots of cash. they're not investing right now because they're unsure of the future, not just the economic future, but also the future of tax policy in all the rest of that. and all of that is tied in hand to hand. that is, to some degree, keeping the economy back. if we can reach some sort of a deal where we are not coming to blows over six months or year on what policy will look like for another six months, that will give us a lot of confidence and create the kind of government that people say they want. i'm not so sure there is really a bifurcation between what washington is focused on a more people said they want because i do think all of it ultimately is about jobs and economic growth. >
the fiscal cliff, we shouldn't do $4 trillion deal. wish to a $9 trillion deal and create the confidence in the world that we're going to manage our problems and we're going to downsize our government so we have a future. because the opposite of not downsizing, not making our choices, i don't everybody gets fired from congress, the opposite of that is at the other end of future. and the loss of freedom, the loss of independence. the morning shows today talked about our lack of power and effect in the middle east. why do you think we have lost effect and power in the middle is? because we have lost our economic might and we are losing the power and effect of our military might. and we won't have the money to continue to be a force for good in the world, because we will not live within our means. so the debt bomb is coming. the question is how do we defuse it? to maintain what we need to do to help the people that really need help in this country, but i should get together and work and solve the problem rather than play the political game. we are already playing a political game about the
americans do not realize. everyone in washington is talking about the fiscal cliff and the tax increases that might come from that. but today i want to talk about something different. those are the tax increases that are coming regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff. and those are the tax hikes that we're seeing because of president obama's health care law. people who have been following this closely know that president obama's health care law guarantees that middle-class families will pay higher taxes. the president promised repea repeatedly that he would not raise taxes on the middle class. as a matter of fact he said -- quote -- "if you're a family making less than $200,00200,000a year, my plan won't raise your taxes one opiniony. not your income taxes, not your payroll taxes, not your capital gains taxes, not any of your taxes." that's what the president said. but once he got into office, president obama arranged for his health care plan to be written behind closed doors. democrats in congress passed it, and they did it strictly along party lines. this law has included more
of the so-called phis fiscal cliff. we look at the unemployment benefits. our first gets is josh boak. and michael -- washington journal is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >>> we have had the explosions of knowledge. but we have not coordinated care and these all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treated. so you to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? and of course now we have the institute reinforcing 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care? when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the test we order, the procedures? in is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care industry. dr. marty on what hospitals won't tell you the latest is "unaccountable" saturday night at 10:00 eastern on c-span2. >>> in the address to his nation, following days of anti-government protests and violence, egyptian president mohammad
of the lessons klaxon not me start with the fiscal cliff i want to say something like the contract for america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. ronald reagan's supply-side economics, i'm proud of the number of things that made no sense in washington. there is no fiscal clef. this is absolute total nonsense. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to write a great essay by thomas wolfe entitled of the flag catchers. this goes back i think to the 60's when he first wrote this. now, she's trying to describe the particular pattern in san francisco in which the welfare department has figured out all of the senior to the to be on the second floor of the office hiding from the people they served screening the people who are mad and the samoan community in san francisco having figured out the game was and so we have six foot five and 6 feet six summer winds carrying the traditional war close and they would walk up to the front desk and say i want to see the boss and a staff person would say we are not supposed to let you see the boss and they would start to hit the floor. so we wo
is cliff negotiations may have on tax incentives from today's washington journal. this is just under 10 minutes. >> guest: >> host: we have been focusing on different parts of the fiscal cliff discussion and now we are looking at tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. joining us in this discussion is a tax writer for see q roll-call, what are text extenders? >> temporary tax breaks. that is the most basic definition. some are concerned the entire tax code is turning to one text extender. where do you define it? traditionally they are considered to be small provisions narrowly targeted at different types of businesses. some do individuals as well. >> host: why are the temporary? >> guest: good question. a lot of people including people in congress say they should be made permanent or they should be eliminated altogether. but they are temporary because it is easier to pass that way, looks like it costs less. usually they keep being extended and extended so in effect they are almost permanent. >> host: we will look at some of these, this is congressional research ser
parties can't get together to come to agreement on avoiding the fiscal cliff. it's as if some are in denial that there was an election and that the president won reelection. and that a whole bunch of us won reelection to the senate and to the house. it's as if the ideological rigidity is still indoctrinaire. and the lesson as that the people were telling us about -- and the lessons that the people were telling us about bipartisanship, that they demand bipartisanship, as if the parties and their leaders didn't understand that that's what the american people were demanding. and here, as the drumbeat grows louder as we approach december 31st and falling off the fiscal cliff. now, there's an easy cliff, whatever your ideology and your approach to this. it can be hammered out next year when we are doing major things, such as a rewrite of the i.r.s. tax code and all that that can portend in producing revenue. by making the code more streamlined and in the process get rid of a lot of the underbrush, loopholes, utilize that revenue to lower rates. but that's for another day after long
leaders plan to handle social security as part of the fiscal cliff talks. later, more on the role of social security would the aarp and david john of the heritage foundation. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. an official with the department of housing and urban development brief the banking committee of the senate on housing programs that provide rental housing for over 3 million low-income families. she talks about proposals and simplifying operations and reducing cost and hud section eight programs. this is 40 minutes. >> i call this hearing to order. i would like to welcome the honorable senator sandra henriquez about the hud section eight program. millions try to afford everyday a roof over their head. currently, persons with a full-time job and earned about $18.50 per hour in order to afford a modest two-bedroom rental, is the national average. this is an amount far from minimum wage for the income provided by social security income. a further penalty is not just the problem of the largest cities in the country. the hud committee developme
: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: with the fiscal cliff fast approaching, i feel the need to point out something this morning that's perfectly obvious to most americans but which democrats in washington still don't seem to grasp. i'm referring to the fact that any solution to our spending and debt problem has to involve cuts to out-of-control washington spending. i know that might sound obvious to most people but for all the president's talk about the need for a balanced approach, the truth is he and his democratic allies simply refused to be pinned down on any spending cuts. americans overwhelmingly support some level of cuts to government spending as part of a plan to cut the federal deficit. yet, the president will not commit to it. he refuses to lead on the issue. the president seems to think if all he talks about are taxes and that's all reporters write about, somehow the rest of us will magically forget that government spending is completely out of control and that he himself has been insisting on balance. a couple of weeks ago we saw his plan. after four straight trillion-dollar
in the world. we on the bridge of -- before it talk about fiscal, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff that created a scenario that led to this ridiculous idea that i voted against. let's put a bunch of bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. we have to avoid doing damage. avoid doing harm. we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. and then we have to have a conversation but getting the fiscal house in order. it's fundamentally true. we spend a trillion dollars a year more than we taken. we have to address it. i approach this issue with the belief the only way with me that in order is to rapid economic order. what the president is proposing does not raise enough revenue to make a significant dent in the debt, but it will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class. that's why i oppose this plan. i think we should do real tax reform. there are loopholes. there's one for being able to write off your yacht as second home. let's go after things like that, but not as a revenue generating mechanism. the way is to r
fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff type scenario with the debt limit that credited the scenario that led to this, and this idea i voted against that, put bad things to happen at one time because that will force washington to do something. well, surprise, it didn't work. here we are, again, facing this. we have two issues to face. number one is in the immediate term avoid doing damage, and avoid doing harm, and so we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short term. we have to, we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talk about that. it's fundamentally true. spending a trillion dollars a year more than we take in. that's a fact. address it. i approach the issue with a following belief that the only way to get that in order is through rapid economic growth. there's no taxes you can raise to bring this debt down. what the president's proposing does not raise the revenue to make a significant dent on the debt, but it will make a didn't on job creation, particularly middle class job creation, and that's w
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18